___Race Snippets

 

49th Tour de France 1962

 
   
 

By Barry Boyce CyclingRevealed Historian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anquetil Struggles but Rules Again
Return of the Trade Team Format

SPECIAL NOTE: The National team structure of the Tour de France in place since 1930 was dropped in 1962. The very powerful trade team, whose members rode for “team “ not “individual”, dominated the Tours of the late twenties. In 1930, race director Henri Desgranges believed very strongly in the Tour's founding ideal of “individual heroism," and he instituted the National team structure.

The 1961 Tour also marked the first showdown of the great Anquetil-Poulidor rivalry. The rising French star Raymond “Pou Pou” Poulidor emergence at the Tour sparked the competitive juices of defending champion Jacques Anquetil. The French duo would battle on the roads of France for year to come.

SPECIAL NOTE: The Tour organizers add the Alpine climb of the Restefond Pass/ La Bonnet to stage 18. At 2,802 meters in height, the Restefond Pass is the highest summit in TdF history.

Defending TdF champion Jacques Anquetil was clearly off his form during the 1962 Vuelta d'Espana, but managed to help his teammate Rudi Altig (Ger) gain the Spanish victory.

The early stages featured a great battle between Rudi Altig (Ger), Andre Darrigade (Fra), and World Champion Rik Van Looy (Bel) with the race lead changing hand five times before the first climbing on stage 12 in the Pyrenees . Anquetil considered the strong Belgian Van Looy a major threat in the overall classification. The only question to be answered was, “Could Van Looy survive the Pyrenees, after aggressive racing in the first 10 days of the Tour?” The question was unfortunately never answered. Van Looy found misfortune, when he was knocked to the ground by a motorcycle on the road to Pau. In the crash Van Looy re-injured an ailing kidney and abandoned the Tour on stage 11.

The Tour entered the Pyrenees Mountain 's Circle of Death (the hardest day in the Pyrenees) from Pau to St. Gaudens on stage 12. The strong climbers and overall contenders for the overall classification began to narrow the final selection of stars. England 's Tom Simpson became the first British rider to wear the Maillot Jaune in Tour history. Simpson was the highest placed rider in the breakaway group of 18 riders and took the record setting Maillot Jaune. His hold on the Jersey was brief, when on the 19 km ITT climb of Superbagneres, Jos Planckaert (Bel) gained sufficient time to take the overall lead.

Belgian Planckaert gamely battle Jacques Anquetil and Raymond Poulidor through the Pyrenees and into the Alpine stages. Poulidor made a major attack on the second day in the Alps, stage 19 from Briancon to Aix les Bains. He rode solo into Aix les Bains for the stage win and moved into third place overall. Anquetil rode defensively in pursuit Poulidor's attack, preferring to remain ahead and wait for the stage 20 individual time trial (ITT).

The final major effort of the race came on the 68 km ITT course into Lyon. Jacques Anquetil, second overall 1'08” behind Planckaert, rode brilliantly and won the stage. He beat Poulidor by 5'01” and Planckaert by 5'19”. The time gain was enough to put Anquetil in the race lead with only two stages until the finish in Paris. Maitre Jacques would not be challenge again in 1962.

Jacques Anquetil rode into the finish in Paris to gain the 1962 Tour de France victory. It was his third overall victory (1957, 1961, and 1962), tying him with Belgian Philippe Thys (1913, 1914, and 1920) and Frenchman Louison Bobet (1953, 1954, and 1955) for the most Tour victories.

 

Stage and Distance

Stage Winner

Race Leader

Stage 1 NANCY-SPA (Bel), 253 km

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 2a SPA (Bel)-HERENTALS (Bel), 147 km

Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Stage 2b HERENTALS (Bel), 23 km TTT FLANDRIA - FAEMA Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Stage 3 BRUXELLES (Bel)- AMIENS , 210 km

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 4 AMIENS-LE HAVRE, 197 km

Willy Van den Berghen (Bel)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 5 PONT L'EVEQUE-ST MALO, 215 km

Emile Daems (Bel)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 6 DINARD-BREST, 235 km

Robert Cazala (Fra)

Albertus Geldermans (Hol)

Stage 7 QUIMPER-ST NAZAIRE, 201 km

Hubert Zilverberg (Hol)

Albertus Geldermans (Hol)

Stage 8a ST NAZAIRE-LUCON, 155 km

Mario Minieri (Ita)

Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Stage 8b LUCON-LA ROCHELLE, 43 km ITT

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Stage 9 LA ROCHELLE-BORDEAUX, 214 km

Antonio Bailetti (Ita)

Willy Schroeders (Bel)

Stage 10 BORDEAUX-BAYONNE, 184 km

Willy Vannitsen (Bel)

Willy Schroeders (Bel)

Stage 11 BAYONNE-PAU, 155 km

Eddy Pauwels (Bel)

Willy Schroeders (Bel)

Stage 12 PAU-ST GAUDENS, 208 km

Robert Cazala (Fra)

Tom Simpson (GBr)

Stage 13 LUCHON-SUPERBAGNERES, 18.5 km ITT

Federico Bahamontes (Spa)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 14 LUCHON-CARCASSONNE, 215 km

Jean Stablinski (Fra)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 15 CARCASSONNE-MONTPELLIER, 196 km

Willy Vannitsen (Bel)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 16 MONTPELLIER-AIX EN PROVENCE , 185 km

Emile Daems (Bel)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 17 AIX EN PROVENCE -JUAN LES PINS, 201 km

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 18 JUAN LES PINS-BRIANCON, 242 km

Emile Daems (Bel)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 19 BRIANCON-AIX LES BAINS, 204 km

Raymond Poulidor (Fra)

Joseph Planckaert (Bel)

Stage 20 BOURGOIN-LYON, 68 km ITT

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 21 LYON-NEVERS/POUGUES LES EAUX, 232 km

Dino Bruni (Ita)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 22 NEVERS/POUGUES LES EAUX-PARIS, 271 km

Rino Benedetti (Ita)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

BEST CLIMBER PRIZE

Federico Bahamontes (Spa)

POINT'S COMPETITION

Rudi Altig (Ger)

 

TdF June 24 - July 15, 1962
4,274 Km

1. Jacques ANQUETIL (Fra) 114h31'54"

2. Joseph Planckaert (Bel) +4'59"

3. Raymond Poulidor (Fra) +10'24"

Starters: 150
Finishers: 94
Average Speed: 37.306 km/h

 

 

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